Alphadia Genesis Review (Wii U eShop)

Alphadia Genesis Wii U Review

It’s been 15 years since the Energi War nearly destroyed the kingdoms of Ghalzabine and Archleign. Clones, after previously being used as weapons in the war, are now integrated back into society, and rendered unable to fight anymore, making them safe to be around during every day life. The two kingdoms have remained peaceful, and have begun rebuilding and prospering once again. It is an era of peace.

At least, until two clones murder a man. Now all hell is breaking loose. People are panicking. Many want clones destroyed. Others want to figure out what went wrong so that clones may live in peace.

Such is the state of affairs when Alphadia Genesis begins. You play as Fray, a naïve hero who wants nothing but peace and happiness for everyone(!), and his team of investigators trying to figure out what exactly happened. Your discoveries will decide the fate of the clones, and the state of affairs between the two kingdoms. Sounds cool, right? Maybe not. Maybe it sounds confusing.

Maybe that’s because this is where Alphadia Genesis’ problems begin. I’ve tried my best to explain the plot for the sake of this review, but if it sounds simple enough, it’s because I’m dumbing it down. The plot of this game is nothing short of confusing at best, and plain stupid the rest of the time.

Alphadia Genesis Wii U Screenshot 1

This I blame on the fact that the game is a port of a mobile JRPG. While that shouldn’t justify the lacking plot, these games are notorious for being, well, dumb. Alphadia Genesis is no exception. The plot tries it’s damnedest to be interesting, deep, and complex. But all of these efforts lead mostly to shortcomings, as the storyline ends up being incredible vague for over half of the game. It’s also no help that the dialog tends to be poorly translated at times (although this will regularly offer a chuckle for JRPG enthusiasts I’m sure), and that as a whole there are far too many cutscenes breaking up gameplay.

Which leads me to my next point: THE CUTSCENES. This is really what hurts this game the most. I’m an avid JRPG player, so I’m relatively used to dealing with a constant bombardment of cutscenes, some useful, others just fluff to extend game time or flesh out characters in a simple manner. But this game, oh man. There are so many points where you will stop, and your characters will simply yammer on about how they kind of, sort of, maybe have interest in each other. Or talk about dried liver. Or one of your characters will be incessantly annoying (actually, one of two characters. There are two characters in this game that are completely unlikable). Or maybe the two main characters will st-stutter their way through an awkward conversation over the fact that they may or may not have romantic feelings for one another (spoiler alert: they do). Which would be all well and good, except these conversations are poorly executed, redundant, and really add no value to the game experience as a whole. I personally was half interested in the plot, but by mid game I stopped caring because the dialog was so repetitive and half-baked that I found it almost impossible to engage.

All of this is really a major disappointment, because Alphadia Genesis has the frameworks of a potentially great retro-style JRPG.

The graphics in this game, while nothing mind-blowing or “next-gen” are probably its finest asset. The overworld is gorgeous. Towns and settlements look quite polished, if not a little bit same-ish and underpopulated. The field map is exactly what you’d want out of a classic JRPG. For what it’s worth, this game will tickle your nostalgia senses for the good old SNES days, simply based on aesthetic alone. And that’s pretty fantastic if you ask me. It’s nice to see a game come out that truly succeeds in replicating the retro JRPG aesthetic.

Alphadia Genesis Wii U Screenshot 2

The question now is, if the game looks so retro, how does the soundtrack stack up? Since there’s not much to say about the soundtrack that I haven’t already said about the graphics, I’ll be quick on that front. The music is nice. Nothing fancy. Nothing horrible. It’s just nice background noise. And what more could you ask for in a mobile port?

The game also succeeds in the gameplay department. It is simple. It is straightforward. Once you get into a battle, it’s pretty easy to figure out what to do, and no tutorials are required. Again, this is refreshing in the modern era of overly complex JRPGs seeking to shake things up and be the next big thing. Alphadia Genesis doesn’t try to do anything fancy. It takes a tried and true formula, and simply plugs it in to the game. You won’t feel like you had to learn anything new in this game. A double-edged sword this is, though. Because of how basic gameplay is, and how lame the story is, Alphadia Genesis isn’t the type of game you’re going to remember for the rest of your life. Nor is it one you’re going to want to replay.

Overall, the game is a dreadfully average experience from start to finish, if not a slightly below average one. You’re not going to be shedding any tears over plot points, and you certainly won’t be itching to play it again as soon as you’re done. If you’re big JRPG fan and you’re looking for something to kill a few days, this is definitely a game worth considering. If not, steer clear. This is not a game for everyone.

6/10

Alphadia Genesis Review (Wii U eShop)
Overall, the game is a dreadfully average experience from start to finish, if not a slightly below average one. You’re not going to be shedding any tears over plot points, and you certainly won’t be itching to play it again as soon as you’re done. If you’re big JRPG fan and you’re looking for something to kill a few days, this is definitely a game worth considering. If not, steer clear. This is not a game for everyone.
Pros
  • Doesn't fail to deliver in the music department
  • The graphics are Alphadia Genesis' best asset
Cons
  • Confusing Story
  • Doesn't reinvent traditional JRPG game mechanics
  • A shovelware mobile port
6Overall Score
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About The Author

I'm a pretty serious gamer who makes jokes about everything. Nothing is sacred.